~ Eighth Annual IQSA Conference ~

Jointly organized by IQSA, IISH and the University of Leiden

June 4-7, 2008

Social Positioning and Every Day Life in Qajar Persia

Wednesday June 4, in Amsterdam at the International Institute of Social History,
Cruquiusweg 31
2:00 pm

and
Thursday and Friday June 5-6, in Leiden at the Leiden University, Kamerlingh Onnes Building, Faculty of Law, Steenschuur 25, Room C131
9:30 am both days

 

 

ABSTRACTS

 

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

TBA

Iradj Afshar

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TBA

Abbas Amanat

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TBA

Touraj Atabaki

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Kaveh Bayat

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TBA

Ferydoun Barjesteh, VP of IQSA, Editor-in-Chief Qajar Studies

To be completed

Ferydoun Barjesteh can be reached at: ferydoun@barjesteh.nl

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The Proliferation of Titles in the late Qajar Era

Houchang Chehabi is professor of international relations and history at Boston University.

In 1925 the Fifth Majles abolished titles. This paper examines this legislative move in light of the inflation of titles that occurred in the early 20th century. It uses parliamentary debates, newspaper articles, and memoir literature to shed light on the motives of the move and its outcome.

Houchang Chehabi can be reached at: hchehabi@hotmail.com

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TBA

Stephanie Cronin

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Dynastic Positioning: What the Negarestan Mural Tells Us

Manoutchehr M. Eskandari-Qajar, Professor, Department of Political Science, SBCC; Director, Middle East Studies Program, SBCC; President, IQSA

The central panel of the famous Salaam Ceremony of the Negarestan paintings tells more than the story of Fath Ali Shah's fecundity. It is a record of dynastic precedence and succession as willed by Agha Mohammad Khan and reinforced by Fath Ali Shah. This paper will explore the identities of the 12 princes in the central panel and speculate on the reasons for the placement of each in their particualr position in that painting and on the importantce of that placement within the larger dynastic designs the mural was intended to reinforce.

Manoutchehr Eskandari-Qajar can be reached at: president@qajarstudies.org


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A Physician of Body Politic in late Qajar Iran: Hajj Mohtasham al-Saltaneh on “Causes of Our Misery and its Cure"

Ali Gheissari, Professor, Department of History, University of San Diego.

This talk will analyze one example of reformist writing in the post-Constitutional period, Causes of our Misery and its Cure, written by Mohtasham al-Saltaneh Esfandiari (1866-1945), a late Qajar and early Pahlavi statesman. It will be argued that the author shared with a range of reformist writers certain views on progress, discovered similar impediments to reform, and proposed remedies along common lines. The text (published in 1921) will be viewed as a sample of the kind of reform manifesto that appeared in the years following the Constitutional Revolution of 1906-1911. By advocating centralization, economic growth, and institution building, these writings anticipated attempts at change that soon followed in the Pahlavi era.

Ali Gheissari can be reached at: alig@sandiego.edu

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TBA

Nayer Glenn-Mostofi

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What Do We Know About the Lives of Qajar Women?

Nahid Nosrat-Mozaffari, Adjunct Professor, New York University and School of Visual Arts, New York

In this paper, I will present a review of literature on women in the Qajar period, and offer a critique of some of the research perspectives and methods utilized in this literature. I will then suggest an outline of the considerable amount of historical research that needs to be done in this field, highlighting perspectives and methods which would provide a more accurate picture of the lives of women in the Qajar period.
A major premise of this paper is the injunction to avoid reiterative history writing, to avoid using tired sign posts as turning points, (eg. tobacco rebellion, constitutional revolution), to avoid the presumption of homogeneity and static continuity in any period (eg. oppression/silence vs. "awakening"), to factor in differences of ethnicity, class, and urban/rural/pastoral situation as important in considerations of gender, and to insist on the use of visual material as a valid source of history.

Nahid Nosrat-Mozaffari can be reached at: nahidmoza@msn.com

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TBA

Reza Sheikh

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