IQSA Ten Year Anniversary 2010 Conference:
Conference jointly organized by
IQSA and St Antony's College, University of Oxford, UK


~ Retrospective and Prospects: Reflections on the Study of the Qajar Era ~

Conference Location:

Mary Ogilvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne's College, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6JF

Conference Dates:

Wednesday August 11 - Friday August 13, 2010

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Session Chairs and Introductory Speakers:

Manoutchehr Eskandari-Qajar

Homa Katouzian

Ferydoun Barjesteh

Houchang Chehabi

Touraj Atabaki

Stephanie Cronin

Hans Timmermans

Dominic Brookshaw

Afsaneh Najmabadi


Conference Presenters:

Firuza Abdullaeva

Dr. Firuza Abdullaeva is a graduate of the Iranian Philology Department, Faculty of Oriental Studies, St Petersburg University, she received her PhD in Iranian philology, art and Islamic Studies with her thesis on the earliest Persian Commentary on the Qur’an (Tafsir-i Qur’an Pak)” in 1989. She was an Associate Professor at the University of St Petersburg when she joined the Cambridge Shahnama Project in 2002. From 2005 she has been Lecturer in Persian Literature at the University of Oxford and Fellow and Keeper of the Firdousi Library of Wadham College. Her main research interests include Classical Persian literature, Islamic codicology and Medieval Persian book art.

She can be reached at: firuza.abdullaeva@orinst.ox.ac.uk

Touraj Atabaki

Dr. Touraj Atabaki holds the endowed chair of 'Social History of the Middle East and Central Asia' at the Department of Languages and Cultures of the Middle East of the Leiden University. He also holds the Senior Research Fellow position at the International Institute of Social History in charge of the Department of the Middle East and Central Asia. Dr. Atabaki has been visiting senior research fellow at the Middle East Centre, St. Antony's College, University of Oxford and visiting fellow at the Academy of Sciences of Russia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. He is a member of the Academic Committee of the International Institute of Asian Studies and member of editorial boards of: Journal of Iranian Studies, Journal of Azerbaijani Studies, Review of International Affairs, Journal of Iran and the Caucasus and Journal Central Asian Survey. His main research interest is historiography of everyday life and comparative subaltern history.

He can be reached at: tat@iisg.nl

Bahram Bayani

Bahram Bayani, currently based in Tehran, is an independent scholar who has written numerous papers on Persian art and culture, including monographs on the great calligraphers Mir Emad (17th century) and Mirza Qolamreza (19th century). He has published three articles on the cultural impact of Christies of London, to whom he is an unofficial consultant. He attended Alborz high school in Tehran and graduated in electrical
engineering from Sharif (formerly Aryamehr) University of Technology in 1970. Later he obtained graduate degrees in computer science, Control Data Institute, University of Minnesota, and Economics, American University, USA. He has written widely on development planning and the Iranian economy.

He can be reached at: bahrambayani@yahoo.com

Ferydoun Barjesteh

Ferydoun Barjesteh is the Vice-President of IQSA and Editor-in-Chief of its Journal Qajar Studies, which is now in its tenth year. He has published extensively on Iranian history, in particular focusing on genealogical research. He is the director of IQSA's Fath Ali Shah Project, tracing the descendants of Fath Ali Shah in the male and female lines. He is also the founder of the DNA research project on the Qajars, which has already yielded groundbreaking results. He has written and co-edited many volumes on Qajar history, including Qajar Era Dress; Health, Hygiene and Beauty in the Qajar Era, the Montabone Album and a volume on the work of Sevruguin.

He can be reached at: publisher@barjesteh.nl

Houchang Chehabi

Dr. Houchang Chehabi is professor of International Relations and History at Boston University. Professor Chehabi has taught at Harvard, Oxford and UCLA, and has held Alexander von Humboldt and Woodrow Wilson fellowships. Prof. Chehabi was also Guest Scholar at the Institute for Iranian Studies of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, in 2004-05. He is the author of Iranian Politics and Religious Modernism: The Liberation Movement of Iran under the Shah and Khomeini (1990) and co-editor of Politics, Society, and Democracy: Comparative Studies (1995) and Sultanistic Regimes (1998). He has also written numerous articles, book reviews and translations.

He can be reached at: chehabi@bu.edu

Stephanie Cronin

Dr. Stephanie Cronin is Iran Heritage Foundation Fellow in Iranian History, University College, Northampton. She is the author of The Army and the Creation of the Pahlavi State in Iran, 1910-1926, (I. B. Tauris, 1997) and editor of The Making of Modern Iran; State and Society under Riza Shah, 1921-1941 (RoutledgeCurzon, 2003) and Reformers and Revolutionaries in Modern Iran: New Perspectives on the Iranian Left (RoutledgeCurzon, 2004). Her most recent work looks at subaltern responses to modernity in early Pahlavi Iran. Tribal Politics in Iran: Rural Conflict and the New State appeared in 2006. An edited collection, Subalterns, Marginality and the State: Strategies of Survival, Protest and Resistance in the Middle East and North Africa, also appeared in 2006.

She can be reached at: scronin2002@aol.com

Joanna de Groot

Dr. Joanna de Groot (DPhil., Oxon) has an interest in three main areas. Her initial research into the social history of Iran in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has developed into work on various aspects of social and cultural change in Iran during that period, and its relation both to developments elsewhere in the Middle East and in the West. This has involved the investigation of issues such as modernisation, popular political movements, and the relationships between material and cultural change in a comparative way which draws on European or American experiences to illumine those in the Middle East, and equally importantly vice versa. This comparative approach is part of a general interest in the problems of theory and method which face historians, which has influenced her writing and research, and her contribution to the MA in History and Culture. Thirdly she has been involved in research and teaching in women's history for a considerable period and works on the history of gender divisions, gender roles and gender inequalities (e.g. in European racial thought and politics,the British labour movement, and "third world" politics) in various periods and places, again using comparative and theoretical approaches as well as empirical investigation. The investigation of gender and cultural difference and their interaction with class difference in social life and political movements is therefore a key theme in her work, together with their implications for the theory and practice of historical research and writing. Her most recent publication is Religion, Culture and Politics in Iran: from the Qajars to Khomeini (I.B.Tauris 2007)

She can be reached at: jcdg1@york.ac.uk

Layla Diba

Dr. Layla S. Diba held the post of Director and Chief Curator of the Negarestan Museum of 18th and 19th century Iranian Art from its inception in 1975 until 1978. Under her leadership, the holdings of the museum increased from a few hundred items to more than three thousand artworks. After moving to the United States in 1979, she continued her scholarly activities and acted as advisor to museums, corporations and cultural societies, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum, The Louvre, the Textile Museum of Washington, D.C., The Guggenheim Museum and the Mobil Oil Corporation. In 1990, Layla S. Diba joined the Brooklyn Museum, where she served as Hagop Kevorkian Associate Curator of Islamic Art (January 1990 to 1998) and as Hagop Kevorkian Curator of Islamic Art (1998 to December, 2000). During her tenure at the Brooklyn Museum in the fall of 1998, Dr. Diba organized the highly successful exhibition, Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch (1785-1925), the first major international exhibition on 18th and 19th century Persian art and culture. The exhibition received exceptional press coverage and was seen by more than 150,000 visitors during its international tour. Royal Persian Paintings was also exhibited at the UCLA at Armand Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, and at the Brunei Gallery of London University in London in spring-summer 1999. As part of the exhibition, Dr. Diba also edited and co-authored the accompanying catalogue publication, Royal Persian Paintings: The Qajar Epoch, 1785-1925.

From 1994 to 2004, Dr. Diba was appointed Visiting Professor at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design and Culture. She continues to write, lecture and advise on various aspects of Islamic Art, specializing in Persian Art of the 17th century and later. In 2004, she curated an exhibition of the contemporary Iranian photographer, Sadegh Tirafkan at the Lehmann-Maupin Gallery in New York and sat on an advisory panel for the Islamic World Arts Initiative of the Doris Duke Foundation. In 2006, she was Islamic Curator for the Cultural Development Master Plan for the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi. She is currently working on a catalogue of the Wolf collection of Turkoman jewelry, to be published by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Dr. Diba is also a collector of Persian and Islamic art and a benefactor and advocate for numerous Persian cultural causes. In 2009, Dr. Diba’s public speaking engagements will include the Keynote Speech at the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Conference on Qajar Textiles as well as the prestigious Calderwood Annual Lecture on Islamic Art at The Harvard Art Museum. In addition to her lecture engagements, Dr. Diba also serves on the Boards of the Encyclopedia Iranica and Soudavar Memorial Foundations.

She can be reached by writing to: president@qajarstudies.org

Mansoureh Ettehadieh

Dr. Mansoureh Ettehadieh graduated from Edinburgh University with an MA in history in 1956 and obtained her PhD in 1979 from the same University. She taught history in the department of history in Tehran University from 1963 to 2000. She founded the publishing firm Nashr-e Tarikh-e Iran in 1983, which specializes in the history of the Qajar period. She is currently engaged in working on public opinion from 1870 to 1920. She has written and co-edited a number of works on this period, some of which are: Khaterat va Asnad Hosein Qoli Khan Nezam al-Saltaneh (Three volumes of the correspondence and diaries of Hosein Qoli Khan Nezam al-Saltaneh), 3 volumes, 1984, co-edited with S. Sadvandian; Majles va Entekahbat az Mashruteh ta Payan-e Qajariyeh (Parliament and Elections from the Constitutional Revolution to the end of the Qajar Period), 1996; Majmueh-ye Asnad va Mokatebat-e Nosrat al-Dowleh Firuz (The Correspondence and documents of Nosrat al-Dowleh Firuz), 1999, co-edited with S. Pira; Inja Tehran Ast, Majmueh-ye Maqalati dar bareh-ye Tehran, 1269HQ/1344 (A Collections of Essays on the Social and Economic Conditions of Tehran, 1850 -1925), 1998; Zendegani Siyasi va Asnad-e Mohajerat (The life and the correspondence of Reza Qoli Khan Nezam al-Saltaneh), 3 volumes, 2000; and Peydayesh va Tahavol-e Ahzab-e Siyasi Mashrutiyat (The Origin and Development of Political Parties during the Constitutional Revolution), reprinted 2002. Dr. Ettehadieh has also written two novels: Zendegi Bayad Kard, Zendegi Khali Nist.

She can be reached at: nti@neda.net

Manoutchehr Eskandari-Qajar

Dr. Manoutchehr Eskandari-Qajar is Professor of Political Science and Director of Middle Eastern Studies at Santa Barbara City College (SBCC). He is also President and co-founder of the International Qajar Studies Association (IQSA). Together with Mr. Ferydoun Barjesteh van Waalwijk van Doorn, editor-in-chief, he edits the Journal of the International Qajar Studies Association (IQSA), Qajar Studies, which is now in its tenth year and the latest issue of which is the ten-year anniversary double issue: "Life at the Court of Fath Ali Shah Qajar" (An expanded and edited translation of the Tarikh-e Azodi by Fath Ali Shah's son Soltan Ahmad Mirza Azod ed-Dowleh). His recent publications include: "The Story of the 'Fair Circassian' and Mirza Abol Hassan Khan Shirazi, 'Envoy Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary' of Fath Ali Shah to the Court of St. James," in Qajar Studies, Vol. VII, June 2007; Guest Editor, Iranian Studies, Vol. 40, September 2007; "Novellas as Morality Tales and Entertainment in the Newspapers of the late Qajar Period: Yahya Mirza Eskandari's 'Eshgh-e Doroughi' and 'Arousi-e Mehrangiz', in Iranian Studies, Vol. 40, September 2007; "Between Scylla and Charybdis: Policy-making Under Conditions of Constraint in Early Persia," in War and Peace in the Qajar Era, ed. Roxane Farmanfarmaian, Routledge, 2009; and "The Message of the Negarestan Mural of Fath Ali Shah and His Sons: Snapshot of Court Protocol or Determinant of Dynastic Succession," in Qajar Studies, Vol. VIII, June 2008.

He can be reached at: president@qajarstudies.org

Hafez Farmayan

Dr. Hafez Farmayan is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his M.A. from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from Georgetown University. He began his academic career at the University of Tehran where he held the chair of European history and became the founder and Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at that institution. Before coming to Texas he held a visiting Professorship at Columbia University. Professor Farmayan's areas of interest are modern Islamic history, nineteenth century Iran and political history of modern Europe. He has written numerous articles in International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, The Middle East Journal, Iranian Studies, and Muslim World. His books include Europe in the Age of Revolution, Travels of Hajji Pirzadeh, and A Shi'ite Pilgrimage to Mecca. Professor Farmayan has an intimate knowledge of Middle Eastern Culture and has lectured extensively on the subject of cultural interactions between the United States and contemporary societies of the Middle East. In his honor a Festschrift was published in 2002 entitled Society and Culture in Qajar Iran, to which a number of his colleagues and former students contributed.

He can be reached at: farmayan@mail.utexas.edu

Ali Gheissari

Dr. Ali Gheissari is Professor of History at the University of San Diego with research interest in the intellectual and political history of modern Iran. He studied Law and Political Science at Tehran University and History at St Antony’s College, Oxford; and has held visiting appointments at Tehran University, Brown University, UCLA, and Oxford. His publications include: Contemporary Iran: Economy, Society, Politics (ed., Oxford University Press, 2009); Tabriz and Rasht in the Iranian Constitutional Revolution (ed., Tehran: Nashr-e Tarikh-e Iran, 2008); Democracy in Iran: History and the Quest for Liberty (co-author, Oxford University Press, 2006 and 2009); Iranian Intellectuals in the Twentieth Century (University of Texas Press, 1998 and 2008); Persian Translation of Immanuel Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Ethics (with Hamid Enayat, Tehran: Khwarazmi, 1991); "Truth and Method in Modern Iranian Historiography and Social Sciences" (Critique, 1995); "Satire in the Iranian Constitutional Press" (Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 2005); "Merchants without Borders: Trade, Travel, and a Revolution in late Qajar Iran" (in War and Peace in Qajar Persia, ed. Roxane Farmanfarmaian, Routledge, 2008); "Vosuq al-Dowleh’s 1935 Lecture on the Philosophy of Kant" (ed., Falsafeh, 2008); and "Kant’s concept of Time" (Falsafeh, 2010). Dr. Gheissari’s current research is on legal thought and institutions in modern Iran. He is also on the editorial board of Iran Studies series, published by E. J. Brill (Leiden).

He can be reached at: alig@sandiego.edu

Homa Katouzian

Dr. Homa Katouzian is the Iran Heritage Foundation Research Fellow, St Antony’s College, and Member, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford. His current research interest is in Iranian history and politics, the comparative sociology of Iranian and European history, and modern and classical Persian literature. He has published both in English and Persian. His recent books in English are, Sadeq Hedayat: His Works and His Wondrous World (ed., 2008), Iran in the 21st Century: Politics, Economics and Conflict (co-ed. 2008), Iranian History and Politics: The Dialectic of State and Society (paperback, 2007), Sa’di, The Poet of, Life, Love and Compassion (2006), State and Society in Iran: The Eclipse of the Qajars and the Emergence of the Pahlavis (paperback, 2006), Sadeq Hedayat; The Life and Legend of an Iranian Writer (paperback, 2002), and Musaddiq and the Struggle for Power in Iran (second edition, 1999). His book on the history of Iran is due to be published by Yale University Press in 2009.

He can be reached at: homa.katouzian@sant.ox.ac.uk

John Malcolm

John Malcolm gained an MA in History form Cambridge University in 1957. He worked as an international business executive for Royal Dutch Shell in Malaysia, East Africa, Arabia and Iran, where he was Managing Director of Shell Oil Iran 1968-1971. Thereafter he was based in Australia until his retirement in 1996. Since then he has been engaged (on and off) in writing a biography of his kinsman, Sir John Malcolm (1769-1833).

He can be reached at: johnmalcolm@ozemail.com.au

Vanessa Martin

Dr. Vanessa Martin is Reader in Middle Eastern History at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her research interests are in Modern Iranian history, especially the Constitutional Revolution of 1906, but also the late twentieth century, and the politics of modern Shi'ism, as well as Iranian social and provincial history in general.

Professor Martin is the Editor of the British Institute of Persian Studies publication series and a co-Editor of their Journal Iran. She is currently co-editing a volume of the proceedings of the centennial conference on the Iranian Constitutional Revolution of 1906, held in Oxford in July 2006, with Professor Houchang Chehabi. She is also writing a monograph on popular involvement in the movement which led to the creation of the Iranian parliament, and the role of non-elite groups within it. She has worked in the past on the politics of Iran in the later twentieth century, especially in her book Creating an Islamic State. Khomeini and the Making of a New Iran (2000/04). A number of her research students have studied this period.

She has written three books, Islam and Modernism: The Iranian Revolution of 1906 (IBTauris 1989), Creating an Islamic State (IBTauris 2000), and The Qajar Pact: Bargaining, Protest and the State in Qajar Iran (IBTauris 2005). She also has an edited volume on Anglo Iranian Relations since 1800 (IBTauris 2005).

She can be reached at: v.martin@rhul.ac.uk

Ali Miransari

Dr. Ali Miransari is the head of Persian literature for the Encyclopedia of Iran (Danishnama-yi Iran) at the Centre for the Great Islamic Encyclopedia. His major field of research is Persian dramatic literature in the Qajar period. He has published several works on Qajar theatre and has delivered papers at various conferences, including the 2006 conference (The Iranian Constitutional Revolution 1906-1911) in Oxford organised by the Iran Heritage Foundation (http://www.iranheritage.org/mashrutehconference/default.htm).

He can be reached at: alimiransari@hotmail.com

Afsaneh Najmabadi

Dr. Afsaneh Najmabadi is the Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and Professor of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University. Her last book, Women with Mustaches and Men without Beards: Gender and Sexual Anxieties of Iranian Modernity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005), received the 2005 Joan Kelly Memorial Prize from the American Historical Association. She was an associate editor of the six-volume Encyclopedia of Women and Islamic Cultures (Leiden: Brill, 2004-2008), andis currently working on Sex-in-Change: Configurations of Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Iran. She leads an NEH-sponsored project to create a Digital Archive and Website on Women’s Worlds in Qajar Iran.

She can be reached at: najmabad@fas.harvard.edu

Ramyar Rossoukh

Ramyar Rossoukh is a PhD candidate in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. He is also the project manager of Women’s Worlds of Qajar Iran, a digital archive and website project.

He can be reached at: rossoukh@gmail.com

Kamran Safamanesh

Kamran Safamanesh is an architect, urban designer and historian whose main research interest is history and theory related to the formation of the built environment. He studied at the University of Tehran and at the University of California at Los Angeles and Berkeley, and holds Master's degrees in architecture and urban design from both. He has taught in Iranian colleges and universities since 1983 and has lectured at academic institutions nationally and internationally. He founded the Urban Research Institute in Tehran, which has conducted architectural, social and urban formation research in Iran since 1980. The center now holds an extensive archive on the city of Tehran and its historical buildings, and also more generally on Qajar architecture and contemporary buildings in Iran. He is the principal partner of Safamanesh and Associates architects and urban planners, which has been responsible for many projects including new cultural and educational buildings, urban revitalization and the rehabilitation of city centers and their historical streets and complexes. The renovation of gardens and buildings are among some of the projects in which he has been involved during the last decades. He is currently completing a detailed study The History of Tehran and another Principles for Evaluation of Historical Building and Complexes, whilst previous publications include The Story of Two Gardens (1990) and Configuration and Evolution of Tehran's Arteries and Roads (1989), as well as many articles in specialist architectural journals and historical publications.

He can be reached at: comsafa@yahoo.com

Cyrus Samii

Cyrus Samii is an urbanist with an interest in the architecture of the Qajar and early Pahlavi eras. He has written on Alborz College and the Persian Saracenic style, on Rolland Dubrulle's contributions to Tehran's cityscape and on the sources of the neo-Achamenian style. His association with Qajar Studies dates to IQSA's first conference in Leiden where he presented Illusory Promises, Iranian cities as portrayed in Western travelogues. Last year in Vienna he presented, Tehran and Trocadero, A search through travelogues for the European sources of Qajar architecture. He has recently completed his first novel, The Blue Flower of Forgetfulness.

He can be reached at: cyrusjohnsamii@gmail.com

Jennifer Scarce

Jennifer Scarce B.A., F.S.A.(Scot) was Curator of Middle Eastern Cultures, National Museums of Scotland. She is now an Honorary Lecturer, School of Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, at the University of Dundee, Scotland, a research and travel consultant, freelance curator and author. She has arranged many permanent and temporary exhibitions of Middle Eastern culture for the National Museums of Scotland. She has travelled widely in the Middle East, North Africa and Eastern Europe -- Iran, Turkey, the Arab Gulf states, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco,Tunisia, Romania and Bosnia -- both collecting contemporary textiles and dress for the Museum and also pursuing research projects such as carpet weaving in Romania, Ottoman Turkish court dress, the tilework decoration of 19th century Iranian architecture and the material culture of the North Africa and the Arab world. Her many publications include a survey of Romanian carpet weaving, articles and books on Middle Eastern dress, Kuwait and Iran and most recently Domestic Culture in the Middle East. She is also interested in European travellers to the Middle East especially those of Scottish origin. She has lectured widely for conferences and groups and has accompanied many tours to the Middle East , North Africa and Romania.

She can be reached at: jennifer@scarce.abelgratis.co.uk

Naghmeh Sohrabi

Naghmeh Sohrabi is the Assistant Director for Research at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies and lecturer in the History Department at Brandeis University. She received her Ph.D. in History and Middle
Eastern Studies from Harvard University in 2005.

She can be reached at: naghmeh.sohrabi@gmail.com

Mohammad-Reza Tahmasbpour

Mohammad-Reza Tahmasbpour graduated MA in photography in Faculty of Fine Arts Tehran University. He teaches photography and history of Iranian photography in the Qajar era at the Art University and other Institutes of Tehran. He is Head of the scholars panel in Qajar era photography at the Iran Academy of Arts and manager of photography of the Islamic Culture & Relations Organization (ICRO). He is most recently the author of the following books and papers on the history of early photography in Iran: Of Silver and Light, Iran History Publications, Tehran 2010; Nasser-od-Din, the Photographer King, Iran History Publications, Tehran 2000& republished 2009, Italians and photography in Iran, Swan Publications, Tehran 2006; Aqa Reza Akkasbashy (works & Life), Tehran photo Museum, 2006; Great Encyclopedia of Iran, (100 Titles about the Iranian Photography), Islamic Culture & Relations Organization, Tehran, (to be published); Qajar Dictionary of Photography Terminology, Cultural&Researches Bureau, Tehran, (to be published); Qajar Era Health, Hygiene and Beauty, (Illustrations Editor) IQSA Publications, Rotterdam 2003, La Perse Vue par Jacques de Morgan, Golestan Palace Publications, Tehran 2001 (About Photo Collection of French archaeologies Jacques de Morgan, 1889-91); Photography (1 & 2) for Art students, Ministry of educations, Iran 2001. He has over 40 articles and lectures in the field of Iranian history of photography (in Iran and abroad, London, 1999, Leiden 2001, Aleppo 2004 & Oxford University 2006).

He can be reached at: tahmasb@gmail.com Blog: www.tahmas.akkasee.com

Lale Uluc

Lale Uluc completed her Ph.D. in 2000, with Prof. Priscilla Soucek, at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and is currently teaching at Bogazici University in Istanbul. She is the author of numerous publications such as "Selling to the Court: Late Sixteenth Century Shiraz Manuscripts," Muqarnas 17 (2000): 73-97, "A Group of Artists Associated with the "Asitana" of Husam al-Din Ibrahim," in Pearls from Water, Rubies from Stone: Studies in Islamic Art in Honor of Priscilla Soucek, ed. Linda Komaroff and Jaclynne J. Kerner, Artibus Asiae 66 (2006), Turkman Governors, Shiraz Artisans and Ottoman Collectors: Arts of the Book in 16th Century Shiraz (Istanbul: Is Bankasi Kültür Yayinlari, 2007), "The Common Timurid Heritage of the three Capitals of Islamic Arts," in Istanbul, Isfahan, Delhi; 3 Capitals of Islamic Art: Masterpieces from the Louvre Collection (Istanbul: Sabanci University, Sakip Sabanci Museum, 2008).

She can be reached at: laleuluc@hotmail.com

Heidi Walcher

Dr. Heidi Walcher has studied history at the University of Tübingen and Yale. She teaches Middle Eastern and Iranian History at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and has worked extensively on the political and social history of late 19th century Iran. Her publications include biographical articles, as well as urban, political, and religious topics of the history of Isfahan, including "Face of the Seven Spheres: Urban Morphology and Architecture of Isfahan in the 19th Century" (Iranian Studies); "Between Paradise and Political Capital: The Semeiotics of Safavid Isfahan" (Transformations of Middle Eastern Natural Environments); and In the Shadow of the King: Zill al-Sultan and Isfahan under the Qajars (I.B.Tauris). She has recently worked on various other figures of Qajar politics, including Kamran Mirza Nayeb al-Saltaneh, Mirza Reza Kermani and Mirza Hossein Khan Sepahsalar.

She can be reached at: hw15@soas.ac.uk

 

 

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